Tag Archives: Knowledge

How to Say No Without Burning the Bridge

Many of us don’t like to say no to a co-worker or a boss, as we’re worried about damaging the relationship. That’s because it often feels synonymous with confrontation. Further, whether you are conflict-averse or conflict-ready, your counterpart may not always handle hearing ‘no’ the way you’d hoped. Some counterparts will try to “yes the no,” because they have

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Why Sandwich Approach Undermines Your Feedback

A “sandwich approach” for giving negative feedback to direct reports is a common method in which the negative feedback is sandwiched between two pieces of positive feedback. But this sandwich approach may be undermining both your feedback and your relationship with your direct reports. First, let’s look at why leaders use this approach and why

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Giving Effective Feedback When Short on Time

Virtually all of the young executives want to be good managers and mentors; they just don’t have the time — or so they believe. It’s not easy to help your employees develop as you take advantage of every business opportunity. But you can make coaching easier on yourself, in part, by giving feedback efficiently. Once

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How To Say “This Is Crap” In Different Cultures

Managers in different parts of the world are conditioned to give feedback in drastically different ways. A Chinese manager learns never to criticize a colleague openly or in front of others, while a Dutch manager learns always to be honest and to give the message straight. Americans are trained to wrap positive messages around negative

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Doing the Same Work Over and Over Again Might Make You Less Ethical

One of the many things managers worry about is employees breaking the rules. Evidence suggests that such behavior is widespread, and it can have devastating consequences. Companies have tried many different ways to limit unethical behavior – creating codes of conduct to implementing ethical training, but these interventions are often criticized for being ineffective. This may be because they’re

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How companies can protect their high performers from burnout

A five-year study in the UK found that the mental health of 20% of the top performing leaders of UK businesses is affected by corporate burnout. It’s easy to blame burnout on the high performers themselves. After all, the stereotype is that these overachievers say yes to more work even when they’re already at capacity.

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How to Disagree with Someone More Powerful than You

Your boss proposes a new initiative you think won’t work or a senior colleague outlines a project timeline you think is unrealistic. So, what do you say when you disagree with someone who has more power than you? How do you decide, whether it’s worth speaking up? And if you do, what exactly should you

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If Work Is Digital, Why Do We Still Go to the Office?

“Distance will die,” or so predicted British economist Frances Cairncross, along with a host of social and media theorists, following the spread of the internet in the 1990s. So, why go to work when work can come to you? Especially, when instantaneous communication with everyone else on the planet could soon render traditional offices obsolete.

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To Find Happiness Focus on Problems, Not Passion

The millennial generation is proselytized to pursue their dreams. But this philosophy no longer works, or at most feels incomplete. And, as the jobless generation grows up, they realize the grand betrayal of the false idols of passion. So what does one do? Let’s look at it with a different frame of reference: Forget about finding your

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The Urgent vs. The Important

“I get completely caught up in fire-fighting and can’t find the time to advance my longer-term priorities.”-  It’s a common managerial wailing. We all have either used it ourselves or have heard people around us use it at work. The frustration one feels, when ‘the urgent’ crowds out ‘the important’ is something we all have

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